Plain Bob

From BathBranchRinging

Jump to: navigation, search

Plain Bob is Plain Hunt with an application of a third (and fourth) rule. We will continue the example from the Plain Hunt page and look at Plain Bob Doubles.

Contents

The New Rule

In addition to the two rules discussed in the Plain Hunt description, Plain Bob introduces a third rule to extend the number of changes that can be made from 10 in Plain Hunt Doubles, to 40 in Plain Bob Doubles. This new rule is that both the first and second bells stay in the same position and the other bells swap. This rule is applied just before the order returns back to rounds; on the 10th change. After applying this third rule, we then continue applying the first two rules.

3 1 5 2 4 8th change: Apply rule #1
1 3 2 5 4 9th change: Apply rule #2
| |  x  |
1 3 5 2 4 10th change: Apply rule #3
3 1 2 5 4 11th change: Apply rule #1
3 2 1 4 5 12th change: Apply rule #2

Of course, when we reach the 19th change the Rule #3 will be required again to prevent us repeating the 9th change. This process can be repeated four times to produce 40 changes before returning to rounds:

1 2 3 4 5   1 5 4 3 2
---------   ---------
2 1 4 3 5   5 1 3 4 2
2 4 1 5 3   5 3 1 2 4
4 2 5 1 3   3 5 2 1 4
4 5 2 3 1   3 2 5 4 1
5 4 3 2 1   2 3 4 5 1
5 3 4 1 2   2 4 3 1 5
3 5 1 4 2   4 2 1 3 5
3 1 5 2 4   4 1 2 5 3
1 3 2 5 4   1 4 5 2 3
---------   ---------
1 3 5 2 4   1 4 2 5 3
3 1 2 5 4   4 1 5 2 3
3 2 1 4 5   4 5 1 3 2
2 3 4 1 5   5 4 3 1 2
2 4 3 5 1   5 3 4 2 1
4 2 5 3 1   3 5 2 4 1
4 5 2 1 3   3 2 5 1 4
5 4 1 2 3   2 3 1 5 4
5 1 4 3 2   2 1 3 4 5
1 5 3 4 2   1 2 4 3 5
---------   ---------
1 5 4 3 2   1 2 3 4 5

The diagram shows the first nine changes of Plain Bob Doubles are identical to Plain Hunt. Rule #3 is then applied when the treble is leading. This forces the bell after it (the 3rd) to "make seconds" (i.e. spend two blows as the second bell). Because the first two bells are making places, the new rule forces bells in third and fourth place (the 2nd and 5th) to swap with each other (they both take a step back) before continuing to Plain Hunt in the manner they were before. The bell in fifth place (the 4th) is forced into remaining in the same place (it actually stays in fifths place for four blows in total).

The next time the treble leads and Rule #3 is applied, all the other bells are in different positions: the 5th "makes seconds"; the 4th and 3rd swap; and the 2nd stays at the back.

In the diagram above, the bell number 2 is shown in red. This demonstrates the path that this bell takes through the method.

New Terminology

Ringing Plain Bob introduces several new terms:

A Lead

In Change Ringing, a lead describes the work that occurs between when the treble leaves front, to when it returns to the front again. The diagram above shows a line between each "lead" of Plain Bob Doubles.

Lead Head

The lead head is the the backstroke lead of the treble. In Plain Bob it is the row on which the Rule #3 is applied. A similar term is the lead end which refers to the row before the lead head. The term lead end is often incorrectly used to refer to the treble's backstroke lead.

Dodging

Bells taking a step back is known as a dodge. This occurs in Plain Bob after the lead end when the 3rd and 4th bells are forced to swap. There are two types of dodges:

  • A down dodge - done as you hunt from the back of the row to the front;
  • An up dodge - done as you hunt from the front of the row to the back.

Making Places

When a bell stays in the same position for a change, this bell is said to have "made a place". For example, if a bell spends two blows in second position, it is called "making seconds".

Long Fifths

The term "long fifths" is often used to describe the work the last bell does in Plain Bob at the lead end, when the 2nd is making a place and the 3rd and 4th are dodging: the 5th stays at the back for 4 blows before going in.

The Blue Line

Rather than learn Plain Bob using the grid of numbers shown above, ringers often find it easier to look at it as a line that represents the path of a particular bell. This is known as the "blue line".

The line for Plain Bob Doubles is shown below:

Bob Doubles

Circle of Work

Looking at it a different way, Bob Doubles can be shown as a circle of work. Each bell (apart from the treble) does the same work as everyone else - just starting from a different place.

Bob Doubles Work

The numbers represent where each bell starts from, e.g. the first piece of work for the 2nd is to dodge 3/4 down.

The Perfect Dodge

It is all about putting the right amount of force so that the next stroke becomes easier.

This involves being able to move up and down the rope to change the speed of the bell. For the 3/4 down dodge, once you arrive for the first time in thirds place, which will be at Handstroke, you will have to pull the bell a little bit harder for the bell to rise into fourths place at the following Backstroke. In order to conserve energy and to safe over-pulling, the Backstroke pull will be less hard, which will help you ring quicker the following Handstroke.

For the 3/4 up dodge, you will arrive in fourths place at a Handstroke and you will have to pull this less hard than normal in order for ease of ringing the Backstroke into thirds place. This Backstroke will have to be slightly harder than normal in order for the bell to be slowed up again so that you can ring easily into fourths place the following Handstroke.

The Next Step

Ringing Plain Bob in this manner only produced 40 changes - a third of the total possible of five bells. In order to ring the other 80 changes, we need to look at Plain Bob Calls.

Personal tools